Tips for choosing domain name from experts

Easy to Type

Think of some of the most popular websites in the world. What comes to mind? Google, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Yahoo, CNN... One big thing they have in common is that they're all easy to spell. Your visitors should be able to type your domain name without a problem. If you have to explain the spelling more than once for it to be understood, then it's too complicated. The last thing you want is for potential visitors to mistype your domain and end up on a different website! Here's an easy way to test this... Tell 10 people your potential domain name and ask them to spell it. If more than a few people struggle to spell it, then you need to simplify it. - ROBERT MENING - WebsiteSetup


Bias towards .com

I know, it's 2017. Why are we still talking about .com? The internet's been around 20-plus years. Why does .com matter so much when there are so many TLD extension options? The answer is, .com is the most recognized and most accessible TLD. Cognitive fluency dictates that we should go with something easy, that people have an association with, and .com is still the primary TLD. If you want to build up a very brandable domain that can do well, you want a .com. Probably, eventually, if you are very successful, you're going to have to try and go capture it anyway, and so I would bias you to get it if you can If it's unavailable, my suggestion would be to go with the .net, .co, or a known ccTLD. Those are your best bets. A known ccTLD might be something like .ca in Canada or .it in Italy. - Rand Fishkin - Moz


Try a domain selection tool

If you are having a hard time brainstorming for an idea, no worries, the internet has your back. Try using a domain selection tool to help you find the perfect domain. Tools like DomainsBot or NameMesh can help you find that perfect domain. But remember to adhere to the advice above when using these tools. - Ryan Shelley - Search Engine Land


Act fast

Domain names sell quickly. Thankfully, they're also inexpensive, so register your favorite domain names as soon as possible. If you're having trouble finding an available name, domain registrars like GoDaddy will suggest alternate names during your domain search to help you find the perfect domain name. - Andrea Rowland - GoDaddy


Avoid obscure terms

If you are trying to appeal to a wide audience, avoid using niche-specific terms in your domain that someone outside your niche would be unfamiliar with. - Amy Lynn Andrews


Avoid numbers and hyphens

Numbers and hyphens are often misunderstood - people who hear your website address don't know if you're using a numeral (5) or it's spelled out (five) or they misplace or forget the dash. If you need these in your domain, register the different variations to be safe - Andrea Rowland - GoDaddy


Easy to Pronounce

As easy as your domain name rolls off the tips of your fingers, it should roll off the tip of your tongue. This makes it easier for visitors to share your domain name by word of mouth, and makes it easier for you to share your site with friends and potential customers. You can test this the same way as with the 'spelling'. Write your domain name on a piece of paper and ask 10 people to pronounce it. If more than a few people struggle to pronounce it, you should simplify it. Here's what to keep in mind: You want your domain name to be passed along easily by you and others. And the only way for that to be possible is if it's 1) easy to spell and 2) easy to pronounce. - ROBERT MENING - WebsiteSetup


Be brandable

Your domain name is the face of your company-in the form of a URL. Therefore, you should make sure it actually sounds like a brand. So, how do you do that? With simplicity, novelty, and memorability. Avoid inserting hyphens, numbers, or anything else that makes it sound unnatural and complicated. A great example is Pepsi.com. That domain name is leagues beyond inferior options like 'Pepsi-cola.com' or 'Pepsi-2-drink.com'. - Denis Pinsky - Forbes


Keep it short, but not too short

Shortness can help keep a domain name simple and memorable, but going too short can have the opposite effect. Compare 'PastaScience.com' to 'PastaSci.com'. Thanks to the abbreviation, the latter is harder to both pronounce and remember, despite it having fewer characters. The first version works fine. The key here is to strike a balance. Go for something brief, but don't mangle your name by hacking off whole parts of words. In the pursuit of brevity, many consider using an acronym for their domain name. But that's usually only wise if your brand or product is regularly referred to by the initials. For example, the World Wildlife Fund's website can be found at WWF.org. That's perfect for them, since their charity is widely known and referred to as simply 'WWF'. - Denis Pinsky - Forbes


Always Register Your Domain Name Yourself

It's a good idea to not let anyone else (such as an agency) register a domain name for you. Even though it's slightly less hassle that way (since someone else does all the work), it can lead to trouble later on. If someone else registers the domain, you're giving them a hold over you and your website. If you ever want to move away from their services, you can encounter trouble in terms of them not being too eager to transfer the domain over to you and give you full control of it. Just to name a few bad things that can happen: They may take an awfully long time to complete the transfer, they may try to extort some fees from you to do that, or they may decline completely (based on some fine print in your initial agreement). Plus, perhaps most importantly, if the agency/person goes bankrupt or loses access to the domain registrar for whatever reason, you could lose your domain name entirely. Long story short, always register your domains on your own. It's not that difficult anyway. - Karol K - Winning WP


Premium domain names for sale

Please contact us if you are interesting in any